The Uncooperativeblogger’s Radio Show’s State of the Union Address

26 01 2011

The State of the Union sucks. There ya go people. No matter what our President/Caesar and our elected cockroaches did, said, or promised tonight, do not believe it. The Constitution is the solution!!! Did ya hear that word tonight? NOOOOOOOO. WhyYYYYY! And no, we did not watch it tonight. Brian was sick all day, but we did record it. Oh, and by the way, it is Unconstitutional to televise the State of the Union Address. It was only meant to be given to the congress and the senate. Not to “we the people”. We will review this on our radio show this Thursday 1/27/11 @7pmest, on uncooperativeradio.com.

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I feel sorry for the United States; By Susan Frances Bonner

21 01 2011

I feel sorry that as a nation of such diverse and hardy people we only have two political parties to represent us. It proves we are not strong enough to stand up to what we believe in. That was the first step towards relinquishing our freedom.

I feel sorry that our leaders are dividing us by lines of race, religion, and income. We’re all in this together.

I feel sorry that after the attack on NY, the pentagon, and the bravery of the United States citizens in Pennsylvania; nationalism, sovereign citizen, patriotism, and God are dirty words.

I feel sorry that our sense of security rests in the hands of unqualified equals who by having merely completed a homeland security program are authorized to violate our human rights in the name of national defense.

I feel sorry that in a land so rich with resources, we cannot rely on each other, or ourselves to live day to day.

I feel sorry that we must be blamed for every nation’s mistakes and problems; the price of bringing freedom to the world is indeed high.

I feel sorry that we can’t come to terms, that no matter how much we talk, tolerate and help another nation, they still hate and want to destroy every person in our country.

I feel sorry that the concept of national and personal defense; which was the basis for our constitution and bill of rights, has become the most controversial and questioned issue of these times.

I feel sorry that the liberals of our country cannot tell every one of their real agenda; to merge us into a one world order. I hate to break it to them, but the Vulcans are not going to rescue us.

I feel sorry that our children are being brought up by either the government, TV, or the local drug dealer. And parents are too busy to care.

I feel sorry that the break down of our families is the fault of our women, who never realized how important they were, behind it all, keeping us all together.

And I truly feel sorry that those fateful words of Benjamin Franklin now sound so ominous… “We’ve given you a Republic; let’s see if you can keep it.”

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Correction to previous post

7 01 2011

Sorry about the the link to the previous. For some reason it is embedded in the text, just click on the first line of text and it brings you to the site and the “rest of the story”. The internet. Go figure.Technorati Tags:





Draft of the Kentucky Resolutions – October 1798

7 01 2011

I will be sending this to the Governor of Arizona to help her in her battle against the federal government.
I know that this is long and tough to read but well worth it. This is the first time that the States had to remind the federal government that they had limited powers over the states. The draft of this resolution was written by Thomas Jefferson for Kentucky against the congress and President John Adams. This is what every state must assert and tell the feds to go scratch! Notice the date people. When was the Constitution ratified? You can use this site to find that out as well.

1. _Resolved_, That the several States composing the United States of America, are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their General Government; but that, by a compact under the style and title of a Constitution for the United States, and of amendments thereto, they constituted a General Government for special purposes, — delegated to that government certain definite powers, reserving, each State to itself, the residuary mass of right to their own self-government; and that whensoever the General Government assumes undelegated powers, its acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force; that to this compact each State acceded as a State, and is an integral party, its co-States forming, as to itself, the other party: that the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among powers having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions as of the mode and measure of redress.





All things New Year

1 01 2011

Happy New Year everyone, may your days be brighter this year.

http://wilstar.com/holidays/newyear.htm

Auld Lang Syne is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700’s, it was first published in 1796 after Burns’ death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. An old Scottish tune, “Auld Lang Syne” literally means “old long ago,” or simply, “the good old days.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup of kindness yet,
For auld lang syne!
And there’s a hand my trusty fiere,
And gie’s a hand o thine,
And we’ll tak a right guid-willie waught,
For auld lang syne

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup of kindness yet,
For auld lang syne!

“Happy New Year!” That greeting will be said and heard for at least the first couple of weeks as a new year gets under way. But the day celebrated as New Year’s Day in modern America was not always January 1.

The celebration of the new year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, the Babylonian New Year began with the first New Moon (actually the first visible cresent) after the Vernal Equinox (first day of spring).

The beginning of spring is a logical time to start a new year. After all, it is the season of rebirth, of planting new crops, and of blossoming. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.

The Babylonian new year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year’s Eve festivities pale in comparison. The Romans continued to observe the new year in late March, but their calendar was continually tampered with by various emperors so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun.

In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the new year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the new year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days.

Although in the first centuries AD the Romans continued celebrating the new year, the early Catholic Church condemned the festivities as paganism. But as Christianity became more widespread, the early church began having its own religious observances concurrently with many of the pagan celebrations, and New Year’s Day was no different. New Years is still observed as the Feast of Christ’s Circumcision by some denominations.

During the Middle Ages, the Church remained opposed to celebrating New Years. January 1 has been celebrated as a holiday by Western nations for only about the past 400 years.

Other traditions of the season include the making of New Year’s resolutions. That tradition also dates back to the early Babylonians. Popular modern resolutions might include the promise to lose weight or quit smoking. The early Babylonian’s most popular resolution was to return borrowed farm equipment.

The Tournament of Roses Parade dates back to 1886. In that year, members of the Valley Hunt Club decorated their carriages with flowers. It celebrated the ripening of the orange crop in California.

Although the Rose Bowl football game was first played as a part of the Tournament of Roses in 1902, it was replaced by Roman chariot races the following year. In 1916, the football game returned as the sports centerpiece of the festival. The tradition of using a baby to signify the new year was begun in Greece around 600 BC. It was their tradition at that time to celebrate their god of wine, Dionysus, by parading a baby in a basket, representing the annual rebirth of that god as the spirit of fertility. Early Egyptians also used a baby as a symbol of rebirth.

Although the early Christians denounced the practice as pagan, the popularity of the baby as a symbol of rebirth forced the Church to reevaluate its position. The Church finally allowed its members to celebrate the new year with a baby, which was to symbolize the birth of the baby Jesus.

The use of an image of a baby with a New Years banner as a symbolic representation of the new year was brought to early America by the Germans. They had used the effigy since the fourteenth century. Traditionally, it was thought that one could affect the luck they would have throughout the coming year by what they did or ate on the first day of the year. For that reason, it has become common for folks to celebrate the first few minutes of a brand new year in the company of family and friends. Parties often last into the middle of the night after the ringing in of a new year. It was once believed that the first visitor on New Year’s Day would bring either good luck or bad luck the rest of the year. It was particularly lucky if that visitor happened to be a tall dark-haired man.

Traditional New Year foods are also thought to bring luck. Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes “coming full circle,” completing a year’s cycle. For that reason, the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year’s Day will bring good fortune.

Many parts of the U.S. celebrate the new year by consuming black-eyed peas. These legumes are typically accompanied by either hog jowls or ham. Black-eyed peas and other legumes have been considered good luck in many cultures. The hog, and thus its meat, is considered lucky because it symbolizes prosperity. Cabbage is another “good luck” vegetable that is consumed on New Year’s Day by many. Cabbage leaves are also considered a sign of prosperity, being representative of paper currency. In some regions, rice is a lucky food that is eaten on New Year’s Day.








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