Isolated measles outbreak has Indiana officials on alert

23 06 2011

FYI, just in case you live in Indiana, have relatives there, or are planning to visit there.

From Reuters.com

State Health Commissioner Dr. Gregory Larkin said his department had dispatched workers to seven nearby counties in northern Indiana to identify any additional cases of the highly contagious disease and to prevent its spread.

The workers have also been given additional doses of the measles vaccine. Individuals who have been exposed to an infected person can obtain the vaccine at no cost, according to a statement released by Larkin’s office.

The article does not go into why there have been these outbreaks. Can you say Illegal Aliens from across the globe and third world hell holes? Being an RN I know that this disease can be more serious for adults than children. Especially pregnant women and women of child bearing age. That is why we wiped it out. And I know there is a movement to not have children vaccinated and I know the pros and cons of that movement, but that will be for a different article. When I was growing up, our parents would just let us get all of these childhood diseases so we would build up our own immunity.
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I feel sorry for the United States; By Susan Frances Bonner

21 01 2011

I feel sorry that as a nation of such diverse and hardy people we only have two political parties to represent us. It proves we are not strong enough to stand up to what we believe in. That was the first step towards relinquishing our freedom.

I feel sorry that our leaders are dividing us by lines of race, religion, and income. We’re all in this together.

I feel sorry that after the attack on NY, the pentagon, and the bravery of the United States citizens in Pennsylvania; nationalism, sovereign citizen, patriotism, and God are dirty words.

I feel sorry that our sense of security rests in the hands of unqualified equals who by having merely completed a homeland security program are authorized to violate our human rights in the name of national defense.

I feel sorry that in a land so rich with resources, we cannot rely on each other, or ourselves to live day to day.

I feel sorry that we must be blamed for every nation’s mistakes and problems; the price of bringing freedom to the world is indeed high.

I feel sorry that we can’t come to terms, that no matter how much we talk, tolerate and help another nation, they still hate and want to destroy every person in our country.

I feel sorry that the concept of national and personal defense; which was the basis for our constitution and bill of rights, has become the most controversial and questioned issue of these times.

I feel sorry that the liberals of our country cannot tell every one of their real agenda; to merge us into a one world order. I hate to break it to them, but the Vulcans are not going to rescue us.

I feel sorry that our children are being brought up by either the government, TV, or the local drug dealer. And parents are too busy to care.

I feel sorry that the break down of our families is the fault of our women, who never realized how important they were, behind it all, keeping us all together.

And I truly feel sorry that those fateful words of Benjamin Franklin now sound so ominous… “We’ve given you a Republic; let’s see if you can keep it.”

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‘Everybody Draw Muhammad Day’ Advocate Rattled by Death Threats

22 07 2010

From Fox News:

The creator of a now-defunct “Everybody Draw Muhammad Day” page on Facebook fears she may be targeted for death now that the cartoonist who launched the online campaign has been placed on an execution list by a radical Yemeni-American cleric.

The 27-year-old Facebook page creator — a Canadian woman who asked not to be identified due to fears of reprisal — told FoxNews.com that she was visited at her home last week by Royal Canadian Mounted Police officials who advised her to remove her page and not to talk to reporters.This was reported on July 12th and by July 16th a new terrorist was added to a terror watch list. Now, if that helps this woman or not, I have no idea because the world is so lax when it comes to war on terror.
“I’m scared,” she said. “I’m scared that somebody might kill me.”

The woman created her version of “Everybody Draw Muhammad” in late April, days after a Seattle cartoonist launched the online campaign to protest Comedy Central’s censoring of an episode of “South Park,” in which the Prophet Muhammad was depicted wearing a bear costume. The Canadian woman said she will no longer act as the administrator of such a page.

“I just want to be quiet now,” she continued. “I wish I didn’t do this.”As part of “Inspire,” a 67-page English-language Al Qaeda magazine, Yemeni-American cleric Anwar al-Awlaki — who has been linked to the botched Times Square bombing and cited as inspiration for the Fort Hood massacre and the plot of two New Jersey men to kill U.S. soldiers — targeted the Seattle cartoonist for “assassination,” along with others who have participated in her campaign.

Then this happened.
From The AP:

WASHINGTON — The United Nations has added U.S.-born radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki to its terrorist list, requiring member countries to freeze his assets and ban his travel.

The action follows a similar move by the U.S. Treasury Department last week, and underscores the growing threat officials believe al-Awlaki represents as a terror recruiter and planner.

Based in Yemen, al-Awlaki has taken on a greater role with al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, leading to his placement earlier this year on a secret U.S. government list of terror targets to be captured or killed, according to U.S. officials.

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THE UNCOOPERATIVE RADIO SHOW The Finest Radio Show on the Internet

16 06 2010

Brian Bonner is the Uncooperative radio show host. He along with his lovely wife and producer Susan will bring you independent and conservative views on politics and culture through opinion and Humor. Find out what it means to be an Uncooperative Citizen of these United States of America! Join us Thursday, 6/17/10, 7pmEST @ uncooperativeradio.com
Show Segments: Brian opines on the President’s speech from the Oval Office on Tuesday. It was Flag Day on Monday, what is that? Then, the Second Amendment Report. We will bring you the ultimate smack down: Islam vs Jesus. And we cont. with the Food Police and what they are up too, and in the end; Medical Madness.
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‘Everybody Draw Mohammed’ Page Briefly Vanishes Due to Facebook Glitch

20 05 2010

From Fox News:

The original “Everybody Draw Mohammed Day!” Facebook page — with more than 80,000 followers — vanished briefly from the website Thursday, causing some users to accuse the social networking giant of censorship before the controversial page reappeared on the site.

Facebook officials said a “small technical issue” prevented users from accessing the page for a “very short period” of time.

“Once alerted to the problem, we resolved it as quickly as possible,” the company said in a statement to FoxNews.com. “We want Facebook to be a place where people can openly discuss issues and express their views, while respecting the rights and feelings of others.”

If this was communist China, or Islamic Iran this story would never have gotten out to the general population. And Facebook probably would have blocked the page from the get go. Thank God we live in The United States Of America, where we still have freedom of speech, for now anyway. If Obama and his ilk get their way, the only speech that will be allowed will be speech that they agree with and visa versa. I agree with Ms. Norris, get over yourselves Muslims.
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MIDDLE EAST PROGRESS AMID GLOBAL GAINS IN FREEDOM

20 12 2005

From Freedom House:

Press Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Astrid Larson
(212) 514-8040 x10
(301) 873-3062 (mobile)

NEW YORK, December 19, 2005 — The people of the Arab Middle East experienced a modest but potentially significant increase in political rights and civil liberties in 2005, Freedom House announced in a major survey of global freedom released today.

The global survey, “Freedom in the World,? shows that although the Middle East continues to lag behind other regions, a measurable improvement can be seen in freedom in several key Arab countries, as well as the Palestinian Authority. In another key finding, the number of countries rated by Freedom House as Not Free declined from 49 in 2004 to 45 for the year 2005, the lowest number of Not Free societies identified by the survey in over a decade. In noteworthy country developments, Ukraine and Indonesia saw their status improve from Partly Free to Free; Afghanistan moved from Not Free to Partly Free; and the Philippines saw its status decline from Free to Partly Free.

According to Thomas O. Melia, acting executive director of Freedom House, “The modest but heartening advances in the Arab Middle East result from activism by citizen groups and reforms by governments in about equal measures. This emerging trend reminds us that men and women in this region share the universal desire to live in free societies.?

“As we welcome the stirrings of change in the Middle East,? said Mr. Melia, “it is equally important that we focus on the follow-through in other regions and appreciate the importance of the continuing consolidation of democracy in Indonesia, Ukraine, and other nations.?

Complete survey results, including a package of charts and graphs, and an explanatory essay are available online. The Ratings reflect global events from December 1, 2004 through November 30, 2005. Country narratives will be released in book form in summer 2006.

On the whole, the state of freedom showed substantial improvement worldwide, with 27 countries and one territory registering gains and only 9 countries showing setbacks. The global picture thus suggests that the past year was one of the most successful for freedom since Freedom House began measuring world freedom in 1972.

“These global findings are encouraging,? said Arch Puddington, director of research. “Among other things, the past year has been notable for terrorist violence, ethnic cleansing, civil conflict, catastrophic natural disasters, and geopolitical polarization. That freedom could thrive in this environment is impressive.?

Although the countries of the Middle East lag behind other regions in areas such as adherence to democratic standards, independent media, the rights of women, and the rule of law, the past year witnessed modest positive trends. Lebanon experienced the most significant improvement; its status improved from Not Free to Partly Free due to major improvements in both political rights and civil liberties that followed the withdrawal of Syrian occupation forces. Elections exhibiting increased competition in Iraq, Egypt, and the Palestinian territories; the introduction of women’s suffrage in Kuwait; and improvements in Saudi Arabia’s media environment are among other encouraging signs in the region.

According to the survey, 89 countries are Free, the same as the previous year. These countries’ nearly 3 billion inhabitants (46 percent of the world’s population) enjoy open political competition, a climate of respect for civil liberties, significant independent civic life, and independent media. Another 58 countries representing 1.2 billion people (18 percent) are considered Partly Free. Political rights and civil liberties are more limited in these countries, in which the norm may be corruption, weak rule of law, ethnic and religious strife, and a setting in which a single political party enjoys dominance. The survey finds that 45 counies are Not Free. The 2.3 billion inhabitants (35 percent) of these countries are widelytr and systematically denied basic civil liberties and basic political rights are absent.

Aside from the Middle East, countries in the former Soviet Union were most notable for improvements in freedom during 2005. In addition to Ukraine, improvements were noted in Kyrgyzstan, whose rating improved from Not Free to Partly Free, and Georgia. Positive change was also noted in Latvia and Lithuania, two states where democratic freedoms had already been consolidated.

Further gains in the region will likely depend on the development of the kind of mature and credible opposition that emerged in Ukraine and Georgia prior to their nonviolent revolutions. At the same time, authoritarian leaderships in Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Belarus, and, most importantly, Russia have adopted policies that will make it more difficult for the development of a genuine civil society and will impede the development of a democratic political opposition.

In Uzbekistan, state violence against demonstrators, the repression of civil society, and an overall decline in human rights conditions during the past year was sufficiently pronounced to warrant a decline in the country’s Freedom in the World score to the lowest possible rating. Only eight countries worldwide earned a similar status as the worst of the worst, and two, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, are in Central Asia. In Russia-whose freedom status Freedom House lowered from Partly Free to Not Free one year ago-the Putin leadership’s anti-democratic tendencies appeared, if anything, more pronounced in 2005.

Among the study’s other findings:

  • The number of electoral democracies increased by three, from 119 to 122. This represents 64 percent of the world’s countries-the highest number in the survey’s 33-year history.
  • Of the four countries that registered an outright decline in status, the most significant was the Philippines. The decision to downgrade this country from Free to Partly Free was based on credible allegations of massive electoral fraud, corruption, and the government’s intimidation of elements in the political opposition. The period since September 11, 2001, has witnessed steady progress in majority Muslim countries in regions beyond the Middle East.
  • The steady record of progress observed represents a powerful argument against the proposition that Islam is incompatible with democracy or is an impediment to the spread of freedom. Indeed, there has been a striking improvement in the level of freedom in majority Muslim countries over the past ten years. In 1995, 1 majority Muslim country was Free, 13 were Partly Free, and 32, or 70 percent, were Not Free. For 2005, the figures are 3 Free countries, 20 Partly Free, and 23 Not Free.

Regional Patterns

Democracy and freedom are the dominant trends in Western and East-Central Europe, in the Americas, and increasingly in the Asia-Pacific region. In the former Soviet Union, the picture remains mixed, while in Africa, Free societies and electoral democracies remain a minority despite recent progress. As noted above, the Middle East has experienced gains for freedom, though the region as a whole overwhelmingly consists of countries in the Partly Free and Not Free categories.

Of the 48 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, 11 are Free (23 percent), 23 are Partly Free (48 percent), and 14 are Not Free (29 percent). Of the African countries, 23 (48 percent) are electoral democracies.

In Asia, 16 of the region’s 39 countries are Free (41 percent), 12 are Partly Free (31 percent), and 11 are Not Free (28 percent). A solid majority of the region’s countries, 23, are in the ranks of electoral democracies.

In East-Central Europe and the former USSR, there is now evidence of a deepening chasm. In Central Europe and parts of Eastern Europe, including the Baltic states, democracy and freedom prevail; in the countries of the former Soviet Union, however, progress has been decidedly mixed. Overall, 17 of the 27 post-communist countries of East-Central Europe and the former Soviet Union are electoral democracies. In addition, 13 of the region’s states are Free (48 percent), 7 are Partly Free (26 percent), and 7 are Not Free (26 percent). Meanwhile, of the 12 non-Baltic former Soviet republics, 1 country is free (8 percent), 4 are Partly Free (33 percent), and 7 are Not Free (58 percent).

Western Europe consists largely of Free countries and democracies, with 24 states Free, 1 country (Turkey) Partly Free, and all 25 ranking as electoral democracies.

Among the 35 countries in the Americas, 33 are electoral democracies. In all, 24 states are rated as Free (69 percent), 9 are Partly Free (26 percent), and 2-Cuba and Haiti-are Not Free (6 percent).

In the 18 Middle Eastern countries, only one, Israel, ranks as Free (Israel is also the only electoral democracy in the region). There are 6 Partly Free states (33 percent), and 11 countries that are Not Free (61 percent).

Worst of the Worst

There are 45 states that are rated as Not Free, in which a broad range of freedoms are systematically denied. Among the Not Free countries, 8 states have been given the survey’s lowest rating of 7 for political rights and 7 for civil liberties. The eight worst-rated countries represent a narrow range of systems and cultures. Cuba and North Korea are one-party Marxist-Leninist regimes. Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan are Central Asian countries ruled by dictators with roots in the Soviet period. Libya and Syria are Arab countries under the sway of secular dictatorships, while Sudan is under a leadership that has elements both of radical Islamism and of the traditional military junta. The remaining worst rated state is Burma, a tightly controlled military dictatorship.

There are two worst-rated territories: Tibet (under Chinese jurisdiction) and Chechnya, where an indigenous Islamic population is engaged in a brutal guerrilla war for independence from Russia.
– end –

Thank You President Bush.








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